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Resistance training is just as good as aerobic exercise, with the benefits of strength and power

Everyone can agree that exercise is healthy. Among its many benefits, exercise improves heart and brain function, aids in controlling weight, slows the effects of aging and helps lower the risks of several chronic diseases.

For too long, though, one way of keeping fit, aerobic exercise, has been perceived as superior to the other, resistance training, for promoting health when, in fact, they are equally valuable, and both can get us to the same goal of overall physical fitness.

Aerobic exercise such as running, swimming and cycling is popular because it provides great benefits and with ample scientific evidence to back that up.

What has been far less influential to date is that resistance training — whether that’s with dumbbells, weightlifting machines or good old push-ups, lunges and dips — works about as well as aerobic exercise in all the critical areas, including cardiovascular health.

Resistance training provides another benefit: building strength and developing power, which become increasingly important as a person ages.





Building and maintaining muscle strength keeps us springing out of our chairs, maintaining our balance and posture and firing our metabolism, as my colleagues and I explain in a paper recently published by the American College of Sports Medicine.

So, if aerobic exercise and resistance training offer roughly equal benefits, how did we end up with so many runners and cyclists compared to weightlifters?

It was a combination of timing, marketing and stereotyping.

The rise of aerobics

The preference for aerobic exercise dates back to landmark research from the Cooper Centre Longitudinal Study, which played a pivotal role in establishing the effectiveness of aerobics — Dr Ken Cooper invented or at least popularized the word with his book Aerobics, spurring desk-bound Baby Boomers to take up exercise for its own sake.

Meanwhile, resistance

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Effortless Strength: Embracing the Benefits of Low Impact Full Body Workouts

In a world where high-intensity workouts often take center stage, the quiet power of low impact full body workouts, including options like Pilates Antibes, is emerging as a refreshing and sustainable alternative. These workouts, designed to be gentle on joints while still delivering a potent dose of fitness benefits, are gaining popularity for their ability to cater to a wide range of individuals, from fitness novices to seasoned athletes. Let’s delve into the realm of low impact full body workouts and discover why they’re becoming a favored choice for those seeking a kinder, yet effective, approach to fitness.

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Understanding Low Impact:

Low impact exercises are characterized by movements that minimize stress on the joints, making them particularly suitable for individuals with joint issues, arthritis, or those recovering from injuries. While traditional high-impact exercises like running and jumping can be tough on the joints, low impact workouts provide a gentler option without compromising on results.

The All-Encompassing Nature of Full Body Workouts:

Full body workouts involve engaging multiple muscle groups in a single session, providing a holistic approach to fitness. The combination of low impact and full body exercises creates a harmonious blend that not only enhances strength and flexibility but also improves cardiovascular health. These workouts cater to various fitness goals, making them adaptable for individuals looking to build strength, burn calories, or improve overall well-being. If you’re interested in exploring such comprehensive fitness routines, consider trying out Studio Pilates Antibes for a personalized and effective approach to achieving your fitness goals.

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Benefits of Low Impact Full Body Workouts:

Joint-Friendly Fitness: Low impact exercises reduce the strain on joints, making them an excellent choice for individuals with arthritis,

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Here’s the Game Plan for Athletic Mums

After giving birth, women undergo a profound array of physical and emotional changes. Physically, the body undergoes a recovery process from the demands of pregnancy and childbirth, including uterine contractions, vaginal discharge (lochia), and changes in breast size and sensitivity due to lactation.

Emotionally, hormonal shifts, sleep deprivation, and the demands of caring for a newborn contribute to mood swings, fatigue, and feelings of being overwhelmed, with many women also grappling with changes in body image and the expectations of motherhood.

Engaging in sports or other physical activity after giving birth is crucial for postpartum recovery, offering benefits such as restoring core strength, aiding weight management, boosting energy levels, and improving cardiovascular health.

Exercise not only releases endorphins, promoting a positive mood and reducing stress but also supports better sleep, addressing a common challenge during the early postpartum period.

10 Benefits of Playing Sports After Giving Birth

Participating in physical activity or sports at the right time after giving birth brings numerous benefits for new mums:

1. Strengthens core muscles

Exercises help rebuild and strengthen the core muscles, especially after the strains of pregnancy and childbirth.

2. Assists in weight management

Regular activity supports weight control by burning calories, aiding in the journey back to pre-pregnancy weight.

3. Boosts energy

Exercise increases energy levels, which is crucial for moms coping with the demands of caring for a newborn.

4. Improves heart health

sports after birth - asian woman stretching

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Engaging in sports or cardio activities enhances cardiovascular fitness, promoting a healthy heart and better endurance.

5. Enhances mood

Physical activity triggers the release of endorphins, natural mood boosters that can help alleviate stress and postpartum blues.

6. Reduces stress

Exercise is a natural stress reliever, reducing cortisol levels and promoting relaxation.

7. Supports better sleep

Establishing a regular exercise routine contributes to improved sleep

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Young women can ‘bank’ exercise for better heart health

resting heart rate at age 41–46 years. (N = 475). Adjusted for age, education, smoking, alcohol, number of children, and body mass index. Horizontal dashed line represents sample average of resting heart rate. bpm indicates beats per minute; CI, confidence interval; MET, metabolic equivalents of task. Credit: <i>Journal of Physical Activity and Health</i> (2023). DOI: 10.1123/jpah.2023-0082″
Young women can 'bank' exercise for better heart health
Average physical activity from age 22–27 years to age 40–45 years and its association with resting heart rate at age 41–46 years. (N = 475). Adjusted for age, education, smoking, alcohol, number of children, and body mass index. Horizontal dashed line represents sample average of resting heart rate. bpm indicates beats per minute; CI, confidence interval; MET, metabolic equivalents of task. Credit: Journal of Physical Activity and Health (2023). DOI: 10.1123/jpah.2023-0082

Researchers from The University of Queensland have found women can retain the benefits of exercise during their 20s, going on to have better heart health later in life.

NHMRC Emerging Leadership Fellow Dr. Gregore Iven Mielke and Professor Gita Mishra from UQ’s School of Public Health analyzed longitudinal data from 479 women who reported their physical activity levels every three years from their early 20s to their mid-40s. Their study was published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health.

“We wanted to explore whether women could ‘grow’ their physical activity, like bank savings, for enhanced cardiovascular health,” Dr. Mielke said. “It appears they can. Women in their 40s who’d been the most active in young adulthood had a resting heart rate, on average, of around 72 beats per minute (bpm). That’s compared to around 78 bpm for the women who’d been the least active from their 20s to 40s.”

Dr. Mielke said while the difference may seem small, previous studies suggested an increase in resting heart rate of even

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Women Retain the Benefits of Exercise Later in Life


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Researchers from The University of Queensland have found women can retain the benefits of exercise during their 20s, going on to have better heart health later in life.

NHMRC Emerging Leadership Fellow Dr Gregore Iven Mielke and Professor Gita Mishra from UQ’s School of Public Health analysed longitudinal data from 479 women who reported their physical activity levels every three years from their early 20s to their mid-40s.

“We wanted to explore whether women could ‘grow’ their physical activity, like bank savings, for enhanced cardiovascular health,” Dr Mielke said.

“It appears they can.

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“Women in their 40s who’d been the most active in young adulthood had a resting heart rate, on average, of around 72 beats per minute (bpm).

“That’s compared to around 78 bpm for the women who’d been the least active from their 20s to 40s.”

Dr Mielke said while the difference may seem small, previous studies suggested an increase in resting heart rate of even 1 bpm was associated with increased mortality.

“A lower resting heart rate usually means your heart is working more efficiently and as it should be,” he said.

“These findings suggest that regular physical activity, irrespective of timing, appears to provide cardiovascular health benefits for women before the transition to menopause.

“It shows us that public health initiatives should be promoting an active lifestyle for women in their 20s and 30s, with the positive health impact

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